What You Need To Know About Negotiation Fallacy Dilemmas – Negotiation Tip of the Week

When negotiating, you should always be aware of fallacy dilemmas. In a negotiation, fallacy dilemmas are offers presented as either/or propositions, whose propositions are opposite one another. They’re presented in such a manner that they seem to be the only available options.

In discussing fallacy dilemmas with some negotiators, they’ve stated that identifying and using fallacies in a negotiation can be confusing. This article will give you insights into how you can engage successfully with them.

Here’s the challenge with fallacy dilemmas, when negotiating such propositions can be positioned to direct your thought process towards either of the options presented. In reality, there may be a number of other possible solutions that get excluded from your thought process simply because you’re being directed to consider only the proposition offered. Thus, other possible solutions are never considered. That’s why you should be mindful of when fallacies are presented.

Nevertheless, while being mindful of fallacy dilemmas being used against you, they can be an extremely useful tool to have. If you employ this tactic/strategy at the right time, you can enhance your negotiation efforts.

How to guard against fallacy dilemmas in your negotiations.

Most know the premise, if you’ll lie you’ll cheat, and if you’ll cheat you’ll steal! If you accept that premise as a truism, you’re susceptible to the fallacy.

While it may be true that liars who cheat may also steal, or engage in any combination of nefarious activities, it doesn’t mean that every cheater steals, etc. That’s the dilemma of the fallacy.

Therefore, to guard against fallacy dilemmas during a negotiation, don’t accept any proposition as having only two alternatives.

Note: If you’re in the thick of a negotiation and you sense you’re being forced into thinking that there’s only to options, pause. Take time to reflect. Observe what the other negotiator does. If he attempts to push you into making one of the decisions offered, consider slowing the negotiation down by being more deliberate about your options.

How to use fallacy dilemmas in your negotiations.

You know how to guard against this dilemma, flip it to employ its usage against the other negotiator. To be most effective, consider presenting it in two ways.

  1. Quantitative – Use this type of offer when you want to limit the other negotiator’s perspective to a specified range (e.g. would you rather have zero or a thousand); this offer excludes the fact that through payment terms or other arrangements, he might be able to garner more than a thousand.
  2. Qualitative – Implement this method when attempting to alter the emotional mood of the other negotiator (e.g. would you rather walk away with nothing or something).

Body Language – Add value through intonation emphasis.

With body language, in this case nonverbal communication, the words you place greater or lesser emphasis on dictates the importance that those words convey. Such dictation will also convey a sense of importance when presenting your fallacies. As such, consider ahead of time what words you’ll use to convey a sense of needed urgency when making your offers and how that will be of benefit in your fallacy presentation.

Now that you have a greater awareness of fallacy dilemmas (did you catch what I just did about your awareness (i.e. if something is true, it can’t be false)), use them in your negotiations. Know that things get out of control to the degree that you don’t control them. Thus, when presented with an offer consider all of the options associated with the possible solution of that offer… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

The Three Steps to Better Sales Presentations

The caliber of your sales presentation determines whether a client purchases from you or another representative. They are usually enough for the prospective client to develop a purchasing decision. Here are three techniques that will assist you in creating a business presentation that will distinguish you from your competitors.

Create the business presentation specific to your prospective client. Essentially the most common errors people make when speaking about their products or services is to apply a general presentation to every situation. You should never repeat the same thing in every single presentation and expect that something in your presentation will appeal to the prospective client.

The discussion of your service or product should be tailored to each client. Adjust it to feature specific points that are exclusive to that particular purchaser. If you are using PowerPoint, place the company’s logo within your slideshow and explain the way the key slides correspond with their specific situation. Demonstrate precisely how your service or product resolves their specific problem. Consequently, it is essential to ask your prospective client probing questions prior to starting your presentation.

Produce a connection involving the product or service and the prospective client. In the presentation to your prospective client, you should prepare a sample of the merchandise they would ultimately use in their program. Following a preliminary discussion, give your potential customer a sample of the product his team is going to be using on a regular basis. Rather than of telling your prospect about the item, you can put the product directly the client’s hands. He could then see precisely what the finished product will look like and is in a position to analyze the product in detail. The client will be able to ask questions and see how their team would use the product. Also, be sure you discuss the benefits of your product or service, not the features. Educate the customer on the benefits they will receive by using your product or service as opposed to your competitors.

Step three is to “get to the point.” Today’s professionals are simply too busy to listen to long-winded presentations. Understand what your key selling points are and discover ways to make sure they are presented quickly. People usually decide within the first ten minutes of a presentation if they are interested in purchasing the product or service. Therefore, do not waste their time or yours by producing a long drawn out production. Keep it short, sweet and to the point.

Utilizing these three simple steps will help you to produce a wonderful presentation that is powerful and compelling. This type of presentation allows the product to sell itself based on the benefits. Not only will you be getting new customers but also your current clients will continue to return. Following these steps will allow you to build a solid customer base very quickly.

How to Present the Compelling Idea in Your Article

The best way to present a new idea is to do it fast and to do it early.

Your first paragraph is one of the most crucial parts of your article. This is where readers decide whether to continue reading or to move on to the next interesting thing they see on the Internet. Without anything compelling to keep them glued to your website, you run the risk of being quickly dismissed. Some people will tell you it’s best to save the big idea for the end. That’s when you sum up all your major points so that they all nicely close on one compelling idea at the end. That’s fine if you’re writing a scientific paper, but we don’t think it’s going to work for a blog article.

People won’t stick around if you’re going to keep them waiting till the end. Whereas if you stimulate their mind and appeal to their emotions first thing in your article, they’re a lot more likely to read up to the last word.

An Idea Needs Support, No Matter How Compelling It Is

The thing is, a great idea will always have its detractors. It’s human nature to want to stick with the old and tested. Even when your readers are deeply fascinated by what you offer them, there will still be that little voice inside their head that tells them to be wary of this new and compelling idea. This is why you still need to provide support in the body of your article.

There are three ways to do this.

One, you can show them factual evidence that supports your ideas. If you did a lot of research, there’s no way you’re not going to incorporate facts into your article. Plus, people can easily verify factual evidence by going on Google and doing the research themselves.

Two, you can tell them stories that make your idea come to life. People love stories. Stories have been around perhaps since man’s discovery of fire. When people read or listen to stories, their defenses are down. It’s like connecting with another human being in a deep and touching way. When you tell them a story as evidence for how good your idea is, it’s easier to convince them.

And three, you can ask experts to give a testimonial to your idea. People trust the experts. They have years of experience behind them and they know what they’re doing. Naturally, when experts say they believe in what you’re offering, people will come flocking to you to try out what you can offer them.

If There’s a Simpler Way to Say It…

We know a lot of esteemed authors, prominent bloggers and writing coaches have been saying this over and over again. “KISS! Keep it simple, stupid!” Another version is “Keep it short and simple.” The idea stays the same, though. It’s been said so often that it has become one giant cliché by now. Sadly, not many writers seem to take this advice seriously. There seems to be a myth persistently going around that a good writer uses big words and long sentences. Supposedly, writers are seen to be more intelligent when they pepper their work with words readers have to look up the dictionary for.

On the contrary, it only makes you look like an amateur. An amateur whose articles nobody likes to read because they’re just too difficult to absorb.

We’re saying this not because we’ve been writing books and other things for quite some time. We’re saying this because it’s true. You can ask any other seasoned writer out there. They’d tell you the same thing. Ditch those words that your readers cringe at and go for words they can easily understand. And it’s not only other writers who agree with us.

There’s a new idea in psychology that supports the idea that people prefer simple things to complicated ones. It’s called cognitive fluency. Apparently, it’s an evolutionary concept that helped our ancestors decide which ones to pay attention to. We know they didn’t have much time to figure out what to think when a saber-tooth tiger bared its teeth at them. Seeing those giant fangs told gave them the familiar pang of fear that made them bolt for their lives.

The same idea applies when people read something. They don’t have a lot of time to figure out what you’re trying to say in your convoluted article. They’d rather have the big idea presented to them in words their minds can easily understand. Put yourself in your readers’ shoes. Do you honestly want to look up from what you’re reading to consult a dictionary? We know you don’t. You would rather look for another article that talks about the same thing but in a way that’s easier to read.

Is Your Article Readable Enough?

One way to gauge how easy it is to read your article is to run it through the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Tests. The tests take a look at the length of your words and sentences to predict how easy it is for human readers to read your article. Generally, you want your article to be completely understandable to fifth to seventh graders. This is measured by the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, which is patterned after the US grading system. A score of somewhere between 5.0 and 7.0 indicates that students in the fifth to seventh grades will easily understand your articles.

On the other hand, the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease indicates how easy or difficult it is to read your article. The higher your score, the easier it is to read your article. You would want your score to be above 60, which is the score that indicates that fifth-graders can easily understand your writing. If you go lower than that, go over your article and give it a good slashing.