What is Trigeminal Neuralgia?

Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN), also known as tic douloureux, is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal or fifth cranial nerve, one of the most widely distributed nerves in the head. It is a form of neuropathic pain (pain associated with nerve injury or nerve lesion), and categorized in two types: primary (idiopathic) and secondary.

The typical or “classic” form of the disorder called TN1 causes extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like facial pain that lasts anywhere from a few seconds to as long as two minutes per episode. These attacks can occur in quick succession, in volleys lasting as long as 2 h. The “atypical” form of the disorder called TN2 is characterized by constant aching, burning, stabbing pain of somewhat lower intensity than Type 1, as in the Trigeminal Neuralgia Market

Both forms of pain may occur in the same person, sometimes at the same time. The intensity of pain can be physically and mentally incapacitating.

TN occurs most often in people over age 50, although it can occur at any age, including infancy. The possibility of TN being caused by multiple sclerosis increases when it occurs in young adults. The incidence of new cases is approximately 12 per 100,000 people per year; the disorder is more common in women than in men.

TN is associated with a variety of conditions. TN can be caused by a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve as it exits the brain stem; this compression causes the wearing away or damage to the protective coating around the nerve (the myelin sheath). TN symptoms can also occur in people with multiple sclerosis, a disease that causes deterioration of the trigeminal nerve’s myelin sheath.

In rare cases, symptoms of TN may be caused by nerve compression from a tumor, or a tangle of arteries and veins called an arteriovenous malformation. Injury to the trigeminal nerve (perhaps the result of sinus surgery, oral surgery, stroke, or facial trauma) may also produce neuropathic facial pain.

Past and Present Overview Of Bardhaman District

Bardhaman district is one of the fastest productive industrial districts of India which is known for its natural resources. The district covers over 7,000 km and is situated in a favourable position as it is flanked by five other districts of West Bengal namely Birbhum, Murshidabad, Nadia, Hooghly and Bankura. In the northwest region the district meets the state of Jharkhand.

Interestingly, the headquarters of the district also share the same name I.e. Bardhaman city. It is commonly believed that the district got its new name after the Jain spiritual leader, Mahavir Bardhaman, visited this place. Mahavir Bardhaman, the 24th Jain Tirthankar, lived in a small village of Ajahapur near Memari Railway Station which presently falls under NH2.

During the 16th century, the place gained immense prominence when the Mughal leader Sufi pir Baharam settled in the outskirts of the town of Sharifabad. Baharam arrived and settled here in a bid to escape from the atrocities laid upon him by his rivalries, Abul Fazal and Faizi. During the Gupta period, the place was better known as Sharifabad and was an important agricultural and administrative centre. Even during the British rule, it became a hub of many patriotic activities.

Owing to its wonderful location, the district is always hustled with a lot of commercial and tourist activities. It can be said that the district is quite well planned in comparison of other districts of West Bengal. It consists of six subdivisions namely Asansol, Kalna, Durgapur, Katwa, Sadar – south and Sadar – north.The National Highway 60 or NH 60 connects the district to the surrounding regions and rest of the state. The other two National Highways namely NH 60 and NH 28 also cover a wide area across the district. All major townships including Durgapur, Asansol, Raniganj, Andal, etc. are connected to major roads. The railway network of the Bardhaman district is connected to two major branch lines. One connects to Katwa and the other connects to Howrah.

Over the past decade Bardhaman has flourished both in agricultural and technological terms. The eastern region is blessed with the rich alluvial soil due to the presence of River Bhagirathi. On the other hand, the western soil is loaded with mineral resources. Various industries based on iron, steel and cement have been established in the townships of Durgapr, Asansol, Rajganj, Murnur Kulti etc. It is to be noted that a major portion of Bardhaman overview is dependent on its growth which took place amid 1955-1965. Today, the region is better known as a rising industrial belt owing to the industrialised zones of the Durgapur and Asansol Subdivisions.

The Hybrid Approach & The Future of Work

What’s the future of work in the next few years? Well, it’s the hybrid model! In fact, the idea of adapting a flexible work environment has been under consideration for over a decade now.

But with the onslaught of COVID-19, employers have been forced to rewrite the rules — quickly. Now, organisations are rapidly introducing remote working and this has set the bar for the new status quo. Physical places will obviously never become obsolete. But the structure has to be redefined to fit the new future of work. And this is where a hybrid model comes in.

What is a Hybrid Model and How is it Beneficial for the Future of Work?

With the transformation of the physical workplace, we should be prepared to change our traditional expectations around the way and the hours we work. Employee experiences must evolve as organisations transit toward a more hybrid model. Neither can everyone work at the same time — whether it’s online or offline. They will rather work at a schedule optimised as per their own circumstances. Read More: Corporate Training Platform

The future of work will demand the perfect amalgamation of technology and humans. And this shift will positively impact companies in mainly three ways:

Employees Scattered in Different Locations Globally

With telework becoming a norm, several businesses will witness the upsides of flexible work policies. They will have the option to either be partially or fully remote. What does this entail? They can recruit employees across time zones, expanding their talent pool. Businesses who have implemented telework practises have discovered that they may save money on overhead, provide greater work-life balance to their employees, and hire from a growing pool of talent. They can also put the rent and cost savings towards staff retention. Read More: Online learning management system

Increase in Value-added Programs

Many firms have expanded their mental health and wellbeing offerings in innovative new ways as a result of the huge stress placed on employees during the pandemic. Some organisations, for example, provide monthly virtual team meditations led by prominent psychology experts.

Employees appreciate the flexibility of these programmes, which contain a clear commitment to the organization’s overall well-being. Leaders recognise that providing genuine support to their teams allows them to perform at their best, with additional resources accessible as required.

Minimisation of Environmental Impact

The present work culture has completely ditched the routine of five-day commutes in high-emission vehicles to and from the office. Many business visits have also been changed to virtual formats as a result of the broad use and growth of virtual events and conferences. This has resulted in a significant drop in corporate travel. Reduced high-emission travel is already a significant contribution to reducing climate change, and increasing use of remote work practises will bolster this trend. Read More: Corporate Learning

Conclusion: Incorporating a New Paradigm to the Future of Work

Many of the executives state that they are confused when they implement new hybrid work arrangements. But, in reality, this new era of hybrid work is the result of years of research. Although the tactics may be different than in the past, the markers of good teamwork will stay essentially unchanged. According to decades of research, the effective hybrid teams of the future of work will be defined by team design, launches, and coaching—in that order.