Past and Present Overview Of Bardhaman District

Bardhaman district is one of the fastest productive industrial districts of India which is known for its natural resources. The district covers over 7,000 km and is situated in a favourable position as it is flanked by five other districts of West Bengal namely Birbhum, Murshidabad, Nadia, Hooghly and Bankura. In the northwest region the district meets the state of Jharkhand.

Interestingly, the headquarters of the district also share the same name I.e. Bardhaman city. It is commonly believed that the district got its new name after the Jain spiritual leader, Mahavir Bardhaman, visited this place. Mahavir Bardhaman, the 24th Jain Tirthankar, lived in a small village of Ajahapur near Memari Railway Station which presently falls under NH2.

During the 16th century, the place gained immense prominence when the Mughal leader Sufi pir Baharam settled in the outskirts of the town of Sharifabad. Baharam arrived and settled here in a bid to escape from the atrocities laid upon him by his rivalries, Abul Fazal and Faizi. During the Gupta period, the place was better known as Sharifabad and was an important agricultural and administrative centre. Even during the British rule, it became a hub of many patriotic activities.

Owing to its wonderful location, the district is always hustled with a lot of commercial and tourist activities. It can be said that the district is quite well planned in comparison of other districts of West Bengal. It consists of six subdivisions namely Asansol, Kalna, Durgapur, Katwa, Sadar – south and Sadar – north.The National Highway 60 or NH 60 connects the district to the surrounding regions and rest of the state. The other two National Highways namely NH 60 and NH 28 also cover a wide area across the district. All major townships including Durgapur, Asansol, Raniganj, Andal, etc. are connected to major roads. The railway network of the Bardhaman district is connected to two major branch lines. One connects to Katwa and the other connects to Howrah.

Over the past decade Bardhaman has flourished both in agricultural and technological terms. The eastern region is blessed with the rich alluvial soil due to the presence of River Bhagirathi. On the other hand, the western soil is loaded with mineral resources. Various industries based on iron, steel and cement have been established in the townships of Durgapr, Asansol, Rajganj, Murnur Kulti etc. It is to be noted that a major portion of Bardhaman overview is dependent on its growth which took place amid 1955-1965. Today, the region is better known as a rising industrial belt owing to the industrialised zones of the Durgapur and Asansol Subdivisions.

How to Convert a PowerPoint Presentation Into an Animoto Video

Most people know how to create a PowerPoint presentation, but many don’t realize that the same presentation can easily be converted into an Animoto video, which can be posted on YouTube and used as a source of video marketing. The following information will identify how this is easily accomplished.

When creating a PowerPoint file I would recommend keeping it small and concise (no more than 12 slides) and ensure your font is fairly large so that it is easily read when the video is being watched. Once you have finished your PowerPoint, save it as a.ppt file (nothing special here–just need to have a copy of it on your computer).

What we are going to do now is to save each slide of our PowerPoint as an image–the easy way. Create a folder on your desktop where your images can be saved. Open your PowerPoint file and then go to File>Save As>Other Formats or in the File>Save As dialog box choose GIF Graphics Interchange Format (*.gif).

Note: Make sure you are saving the *.gifs into the folder created earlier.

Click the Save button in PowerPoint and the images will be saved inside the folder that you created–you will now have 10-12 images saved.

If you haven’t already, create a free account on Animoto. Choose to create a video on Animoto, select a free background. A preview of the background will display. Click the link that says, “make a 30-second video for free.” You only need a free video to use, but you can pay if you would like a longer video.

The video interface will display. Click the Upload Images button and point it to the folder where you saved your PowerPoint *.gif images. You may need to adjust the arrangement of your images in Animoto–you can even add slides, if necessary. Select or upload the music for your video.

Click the Finalize button and you will be given the opportunity to enter information about your video.This is where you can enter SEO terms and other variables to help your video to be used for video marketing. Once finished click the Create Video button. Once the video has been created you can choose to export the video to YouTube. Once in YouTube you can add additional information useful for SEO and video marketing.

All in all, this process takes 5 minutes or less, but is very effective. For help with this or for more information, please feel free to visit our website or send us an email.

Negotiating – Smart V Stupid

Experience has shown that some of the typical approaches in negotiation are very smart… or just the opposite. Here are ten of the most common, starting with the smart ones.

Start Positively with Compliments

Smart negotiators realise that the atmosphere they create will impact in the other’s perception and behaviour. Make it clear that your intention is to find the best deal for both of you. Rather than positioning each other as competitors, see each other as partners working together to solve your mutual problem. Just like a mountaineer needs a partner to reach the highest peak, you need each other to achieve the best mutually beneficial agreement.

If you can include an appropriate compliment, it will not only fast-track your rapport-building, it will also introduce positive labelling. It has also been shown that by positively labelling someone, you can influence them to act more that way. So, if, for example, you were to compliment them on being so understanding, it might just cause them to try to be more understanding!

Make Them Aware of Your Preparation

Your preparation is often the most important work you do in a negotiation. Thorough preparation gives you the foundation to make your offer with confidence and the leverage to unsettle the other side.

If you know something that they don’t know you know, use it early. Some negotiators will hold back this information, saving it as ‘ammunition’ to use if the other party becomes difficult. You will get better results if you reveal this information early – before offers are put on the table. Doing this surprises the other side, causing them to doubt the quality of their preparation. If I can compromise your confidence in your preparation, I create doubt about the validity of your offer which was based on that preparation.

Ask Their Opinion Before Making Your Offer

Most negotiators can only ascertain the other side’s reaction to their offer after they have put it on the table. Once an offer is made, it cannot be retracted. Smart negotiators do all they can to test the other’s opinion before any offer is tabled. They create a conversation where neither side makes any commitments, they just share ideas and reactions to better understand each other’s interests and priorities. They might use a line like, “I’m not looking at any commitments yet, but how would you feel if we put this with this in a package that includes… “

Once either side puts an offer on the table bargaining starts – and information sharing stops. So, you need to get as much information as possible before you start bargaining.

Refer to the Authority and Influence of Others

It’s unrealistic to expect anyone in a negotiation to accept the other party’s figures, so you need to find an authoritative source you can both agree on.

If I try to change your thinking in a negotiation by confronting your ideas, it is likely you will just become more entrenched in your ideas as you argue against me. It has been shown that I can influence your thinking by pointing to the actions of others whom you see as similar to you. Identifying any such reference points is part of a smart negotiator’s preparation.

Tie-Together a Package with the Maximum Perceived Value

It is virtually impossible to negotiate a win-win outcome over a single issue. Use your preparation and your non-committal discussions with them at the opening of the negotiation to create an integrated package with the maximum perceived value; remembering that something that has high perceived value to them might actually cost you very little.

Conversely, there are many stupid negotiation behaviours.

Start Aggressively with Criticism

Some negotiators start out with the thought, “I’m going to show them what a tough negotiator I am.” Research has proven that when I perceive you as being competitive, I become more competitive, I am less likely to share information with you and I become less flexible with my offer(s). Not a smart way to start!

Table Your Offer Early

Moving too quickly into bargaining will limit the chances of finding the maximum possible value for a deal.

Undermine Their Offer and/or Authority

It’s okay to question their offer, but putting it or them down will only result in a negative response.

Play Your Cards Close to Your Chest

This is negotiation – not poker! Failure to share information (that could have in no way compromised either position) is one of the main reasons for poor agreements.

Irritate Them – To Get Them to Do or Say Something They’ll Regret

Only works with very inexperienced negotiators.

Demand Answers After You’ve Backed Them into a Corner

Okay, so you’ve out-negotiated them with you clever ‘traps’. Now you have someone who resents you and you have to work with them to make this deal generate value.

When negotiating, you have choices… choose the smart ones!