Keeping Your Voice Strong While Presenting

Sometimes when you’re presenting, introducing yourself or answering questions in front of a group, your voice trails off at the end of the sentence. Your audience can’t understand the last part of your sentence and you may sound nervous and unprepared. Here are four tips for keeping your voice strong throughout your presentation:

1. Breathe
When you take short, shallow breaths, there is not enough oxygen to fuel your voice through the end of the sentence. You literally run out of air by the end of the sentence. To prevent this from happening, take full, deep breaths which will energize your voice.

2. Pause More
You won’t have enough air to race through several long sentences delivered end-to-end. Pausing during or between sentences will give you a chance to catch your breath and your audience a change to digest what you’ve just said. It also helps you emphasize important words or phrases. Pausing will feel awkward at first, but with practice, you will get more comfortable.

3. Use a Microphone
If there is a microphone available, use it. The microphone will make it easier for you to project your voice. As I stated in another article, “How to Use a Microphone Like a Pro,” you should practice the mechanics of using a microphone so you can do it successfully.

4. Be Confident
Sometimes your voice may trail off because you are not confident about what you are saying or how you are saying it. Work on overcoming any fear you have of presenting in general and then focus specifically on your anxiety about presenting this topic to this audience at this time. If you still don’t feel confident, act as if you do – and it will help you feel more confident.

Keeping your voice strong throughout your entire presentation will help you deliver your message to your audience with energy and confidence.

What You Need To Know About Negotiation Fallacy Dilemmas – Negotiation Tip of the Week

When negotiating, you should always be aware of fallacy dilemmas. In a negotiation, fallacy dilemmas are offers presented as either/or propositions, whose propositions are opposite one another. They’re presented in such a manner that they seem to be the only available options.

In discussing fallacy dilemmas with some negotiators, they’ve stated that identifying and using fallacies in a negotiation can be confusing. This article will give you insights into how you can engage successfully with them.

Here’s the challenge with fallacy dilemmas, when negotiating such propositions can be positioned to direct your thought process towards either of the options presented. In reality, there may be a number of other possible solutions that get excluded from your thought process simply because you’re being directed to consider only the proposition offered. Thus, other possible solutions are never considered. That’s why you should be mindful of when fallacies are presented.

Nevertheless, while being mindful of fallacy dilemmas being used against you, they can be an extremely useful tool to have. If you employ this tactic/strategy at the right time, you can enhance your negotiation efforts.

How to guard against fallacy dilemmas in your negotiations.

Most know the premise, if you’ll lie you’ll cheat, and if you’ll cheat you’ll steal! If you accept that premise as a truism, you’re susceptible to the fallacy.

While it may be true that liars who cheat may also steal, or engage in any combination of nefarious activities, it doesn’t mean that every cheater steals, etc. That’s the dilemma of the fallacy.

Therefore, to guard against fallacy dilemmas during a negotiation, don’t accept any proposition as having only two alternatives.

Note: If you’re in the thick of a negotiation and you sense you’re being forced into thinking that there’s only to options, pause. Take time to reflect. Observe what the other negotiator does. If he attempts to push you into making one of the decisions offered, consider slowing the negotiation down by being more deliberate about your options.

How to use fallacy dilemmas in your negotiations.

You know how to guard against this dilemma, flip it to employ its usage against the other negotiator. To be most effective, consider presenting it in two ways.

  1. Quantitative – Use this type of offer when you want to limit the other negotiator’s perspective to a specified range (e.g. would you rather have zero or a thousand); this offer excludes the fact that through payment terms or other arrangements, he might be able to garner more than a thousand.
  2. Qualitative – Implement this method when attempting to alter the emotional mood of the other negotiator (e.g. would you rather walk away with nothing or something).

Body Language – Add value through intonation emphasis.

With body language, in this case nonverbal communication, the words you place greater or lesser emphasis on dictates the importance that those words convey. Such dictation will also convey a sense of importance when presenting your fallacies. As such, consider ahead of time what words you’ll use to convey a sense of needed urgency when making your offers and how that will be of benefit in your fallacy presentation.

Now that you have a greater awareness of fallacy dilemmas (did you catch what I just did about your awareness (i.e. if something is true, it can’t be false)), use them in your negotiations. Know that things get out of control to the degree that you don’t control them. Thus, when presented with an offer consider all of the options associated with the possible solution of that offer… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

Managing Constantly Present UTIs in the Urinary Tract

One of the most persistent and potentially dangerous problems that disabled seniors with late stage Dementia have to live with are multiple UTI bacteria which permanently exist in their urinary tract. Here is my personal experience as a Caregiver.

There can be several reasons why this happens. With our mom, the reason had been partially due to kidney stones. And her weakened immune system had not been strong enough to render these residing organisms completely harmless even with the aid of antibiotics. So, these bacteria ended up ever present in certain localized areas in the body.

This situation is especially true for, what I consider, “special needs” seniors with two or more other physical ailments. These types of people are essentially confined to the bed. They have to be turned and fed by g-tube. And most often Nursing Homes are not the ideal place for them. The majority of them do not talk. They have contractures and they are incontinent. More important, they are totally dependent on the care of a live-in primary caregiver. It is for these reasons that they are considered “special needs”.

The goal then becomes not to get rid of the infections, but to manage and control their severity. If these germs are not treated and/or properly managed, they can cause some real damage like kidney failure or death.

Understand, however, that many bacteria reside in the body with symbiotic relationships. It is when certain ones unintentionally are allowed to compromise their unique living arrangements that they then can create damage.

First, what are UTI? According to The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, it is an infection in the urinary tract. 1 in 5 women will experience UTIs in her lifetime. These infections are caused by microbes which are organisms too small to be seen without a microscope. This includes fungi, viruses, and bacteria. However, bacteria are the most common cause of UTIs. There are basically three kinds of UTIs:

* Urethritis is an infection in the urethra.

* Cystitis is an infection in the bladder.

* Pyelonephritis is an infection in the kidneys

So, what are some of the names of the bacteria which can cause so much damage in the body? Three of the most recognized are: (a) Escherichia coli, (b) Klebsiella pneumoniae, (c) Streptococcus epidermidis.

Managing them can be tricky and a real inconvenience. Every time my mom had urine samples done at the hospital or clinic, two of these bacteria are always more prominent in my mom’s urine than some others: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella. Her doctors had decided years ago to keep her on a low dose maintenance of antibiotics at home to control them.

They also become resistant to certain antibiotics. Whenever these germs occasionally did manage to progress to a more dangerous level-for whatever reasons-they required us to take our mother to the hospital for a few rounds of intravenous antibiotics. That usually stabilized any potential harm.

At home, however, we eventually had learned how to manage these infections in our mom by way of monitoring, early detection, proper hydration and vitamin intake. These routines should be performed daily to ascertain that the level of bacteria growth in her system remains low.

MONITORING THE URINE:

(1) Visually check the adult underwear throughout the day. Whenever it becomes full and ready to be discarded, always check the color, odor and volume of the urine.

(2) Make a note of it in a daily care journal. Usually, foul smelling urine, bad color and/or low urine volume mean that the status of severity has increased.

(3) Remember. All three of these areas of concern (color, odor and volume) might not progress at the same rate. Only one area might be noticeably dominant.

(4) Always consider these three areas in relationship to each other. Check the urine often.

When the odor is noticeably foul and/or strong, chances are likely that the infection has multiplied to a dangerous level.

Lemon yellow is the normal color of urine. Light, medium or dark tea colors signifies guarded caution. Rust or Red colors means full alert-SOME APPROPRIATE AND TIMELY ACTION MUST BE TAKEN!!

The volume of urine is important as well. Water in; water out! If there is not sufficient amount of urine in the adult underwear, it might mean that your senior could be withholding voiding for fear of pain which means the infection has elevated. It could also mean possible blockage-especially if the senior has kidney stones. You may need to call your doctor if that condition continues-especially if it is accompanied by higher body temperatures or other related symptoms.

EARLY DETECTION IS KEY:

(1) When looking at the color of the urine in a soiled adult underwear, make note of first signs of discoloration and odor.

(2) Journalize the advent of the change and watch its progress.

(3) Choke off the growth, if possible. Sometimes simply giving the patient more water or some kind of acidic juice can slow the growth of the germ.

(4) Continue to maintain daily ingestion of maintenance antibiotic. Your daily recordings is your early detection tool.

PROPER HYDRATION:

(a) The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The (AI) for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day. So how much water is enough to employ as a tool to control constant UTIs in the urine.

(b) Too much water can cause hyponatremia. It is a condition where more than normal amounts of sodium is flushed out of the system from drinking too much water. Marathon runners can experience this condition when drinking excessive amounts of H20.

(c) We discussed with our mom’s urologist about finding a workable consumption of water to help treat UTIs and to help flush out Kidney stones. Water can be a useful tool in managing UTIs. Remember: Each doctor often has a different opinion. At home, we had been following different doctors’ advice for years and found that every one of them has a different opinion to offer.

(d) Ultimately it depends on the caregiver to take notes, closely monitor his love one’s water-infection relationship and act accordingly. It has been my experience to hear doctors tell us one way and then blame us if it doesn’t ‘pan out”.

(e) The key to this water technique of controlling UTIs is to make scheduled visits to the doctor and/or clinic and have complete blood work done. Lab reports will show current changes in the levels of sodium or potassium in the bloodstream. Thus, water can indeed be a useful flushing technique in controlling the growth of permanently residing or recurrent infections in the urinary tract.

VITAMIN INTAKE:

(1) Vitamin C is a good source of ascorbic acid. When the urinary tract is coated with a sufficient amount of acid, germs find a difficult time sticking to the surface. Vitamin C can limit bacteria growth.

(2) Cranberry juice is often praised by doctors and nurses as the number one juice which inhibits the growth of UTIs. What they fail to also mention is that if your ailing senior has kidney stones, cranberry juice often exacerbate the condition as it creates stones as well. Remember: Cranberry juice is not the only juice that contains ascorbic acid. Lime, lemon or a simple vitamin C tab can be an adequate substitute for Cranberry juice.

(3) Make sure that vitamin C is a daily part of your Senior’s diet.

So yes. These diseases can be a menace! Everyone’s body is different. However chronic or ever present UTIs can be managed with a plan that should be collaborated between the primary caregiver and the doctor. Talk with him or her about a water and low dose antibiotic regimen. It worked for my mom.