Managing Constantly Present UTIs in the Urinary Tract

One of the most persistent and potentially dangerous problems that disabled seniors with late stage Dementia have to live with are multiple UTI bacteria which permanently exist in their urinary tract. Here is my personal experience as a Caregiver.

There can be several reasons why this happens. With our mom, the reason had been partially due to kidney stones. And her weakened immune system had not been strong enough to render these residing organisms completely harmless even with the aid of antibiotics. So, these bacteria ended up ever present in certain localized areas in the body.

This situation is especially true for, what I consider, “special needs” seniors with two or more other physical ailments. These types of people are essentially confined to the bed. They have to be turned and fed by g-tube. And most often Nursing Homes are not the ideal place for them. The majority of them do not talk. They have contractures and they are incontinent. More important, they are totally dependent on the care of a live-in primary caregiver. It is for these reasons that they are considered “special needs”.

The goal then becomes not to get rid of the infections, but to manage and control their severity. If these germs are not treated and/or properly managed, they can cause some real damage like kidney failure or death.

Understand, however, that many bacteria reside in the body with symbiotic relationships. It is when certain ones unintentionally are allowed to compromise their unique living arrangements that they then can create damage.

First, what are UTI? According to The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, it is an infection in the urinary tract. 1 in 5 women will experience UTIs in her lifetime. These infections are caused by microbes which are organisms too small to be seen without a microscope. This includes fungi, viruses, and bacteria. However, bacteria are the most common cause of UTIs. There are basically three kinds of UTIs:

* Urethritis is an infection in the urethra.

* Cystitis is an infection in the bladder.

* Pyelonephritis is an infection in the kidneys

So, what are some of the names of the bacteria which can cause so much damage in the body? Three of the most recognized are: (a) Escherichia coli, (b) Klebsiella pneumoniae, (c) Streptococcus epidermidis.

Managing them can be tricky and a real inconvenience. Every time my mom had urine samples done at the hospital or clinic, two of these bacteria are always more prominent in my mom’s urine than some others: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella. Her doctors had decided years ago to keep her on a low dose maintenance of antibiotics at home to control them.

They also become resistant to certain antibiotics. Whenever these germs occasionally did manage to progress to a more dangerous level-for whatever reasons-they required us to take our mother to the hospital for a few rounds of intravenous antibiotics. That usually stabilized any potential harm.

At home, however, we eventually had learned how to manage these infections in our mom by way of monitoring, early detection, proper hydration and vitamin intake. These routines should be performed daily to ascertain that the level of bacteria growth in her system remains low.

MONITORING THE URINE:

(1) Visually check the adult underwear throughout the day. Whenever it becomes full and ready to be discarded, always check the color, odor and volume of the urine.

(2) Make a note of it in a daily care journal. Usually, foul smelling urine, bad color and/or low urine volume mean that the status of severity has increased.

(3) Remember. All three of these areas of concern (color, odor and volume) might not progress at the same rate. Only one area might be noticeably dominant.

(4) Always consider these three areas in relationship to each other. Check the urine often.

When the odor is noticeably foul and/or strong, chances are likely that the infection has multiplied to a dangerous level.

Lemon yellow is the normal color of urine. Light, medium or dark tea colors signifies guarded caution. Rust or Red colors means full alert-SOME APPROPRIATE AND TIMELY ACTION MUST BE TAKEN!!

The volume of urine is important as well. Water in; water out! If there is not sufficient amount of urine in the adult underwear, it might mean that your senior could be withholding voiding for fear of pain which means the infection has elevated. It could also mean possible blockage-especially if the senior has kidney stones. You may need to call your doctor if that condition continues-especially if it is accompanied by higher body temperatures or other related symptoms.

EARLY DETECTION IS KEY:

(1) When looking at the color of the urine in a soiled adult underwear, make note of first signs of discoloration and odor.

(2) Journalize the advent of the change and watch its progress.

(3) Choke off the growth, if possible. Sometimes simply giving the patient more water or some kind of acidic juice can slow the growth of the germ.

(4) Continue to maintain daily ingestion of maintenance antibiotic. Your daily recordings is your early detection tool.

PROPER HYDRATION:

(a) The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The (AI) for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day. So how much water is enough to employ as a tool to control constant UTIs in the urine.

(b) Too much water can cause hyponatremia. It is a condition where more than normal amounts of sodium is flushed out of the system from drinking too much water. Marathon runners can experience this condition when drinking excessive amounts of H20.

(c) We discussed with our mom’s urologist about finding a workable consumption of water to help treat UTIs and to help flush out Kidney stones. Water can be a useful tool in managing UTIs. Remember: Each doctor often has a different opinion. At home, we had been following different doctors’ advice for years and found that every one of them has a different opinion to offer.

(d) Ultimately it depends on the caregiver to take notes, closely monitor his love one’s water-infection relationship and act accordingly. It has been my experience to hear doctors tell us one way and then blame us if it doesn’t ‘pan out”.

(e) The key to this water technique of controlling UTIs is to make scheduled visits to the doctor and/or clinic and have complete blood work done. Lab reports will show current changes in the levels of sodium or potassium in the bloodstream. Thus, water can indeed be a useful flushing technique in controlling the growth of permanently residing or recurrent infections in the urinary tract.

VITAMIN INTAKE:

(1) Vitamin C is a good source of ascorbic acid. When the urinary tract is coated with a sufficient amount of acid, germs find a difficult time sticking to the surface. Vitamin C can limit bacteria growth.

(2) Cranberry juice is often praised by doctors and nurses as the number one juice which inhibits the growth of UTIs. What they fail to also mention is that if your ailing senior has kidney stones, cranberry juice often exacerbate the condition as it creates stones as well. Remember: Cranberry juice is not the only juice that contains ascorbic acid. Lime, lemon or a simple vitamin C tab can be an adequate substitute for Cranberry juice.

(3) Make sure that vitamin C is a daily part of your Senior’s diet.

So yes. These diseases can be a menace! Everyone’s body is different. However chronic or ever present UTIs can be managed with a plan that should be collaborated between the primary caregiver and the doctor. Talk with him or her about a water and low dose antibiotic regimen. It worked for my mom.

Decorative Presentation Pocket Folders Vs Simple Pocket Presentation Folders

Below are the differences between decorative presentation pocket folders and simple presentation pocket folders.

Decorative Presentation Pocket Folders

  • More rich in design hence catch more attention of client
  • More expensive as customization is involved
  • Can be customized in different die cut shapes of the panels to give it a custom shape
  • Different kinds of finishing are applied to give the rich design more attraction
  • Spot UV coating is one of the major feature of the decorative company folders and gives a nice effect to the rich full color design
  • Full color printing on both sides to give more space to your message. Inside printing can be useful and present more information about your businesses while customer is opening and checking stuff inside two pocket folders
  • Sand effect is also a great effect used in decorative folders, it actually gives the effect of sand while seeing it and touching it
  • Glow in the dark ink is also used in decorative two panel folders to give them the real active look for which two pocket folders speaks for itself
  • Hexachrome printing method is used in decorative folders to give more accurate and rich color printing. Hexachrome printing is done using 6 process colors and is more advanced than the conventional 4 color process printing
  • Metalized card stock and metallic inks and also panatone colors are used to give decorative presentation pocket folders the look you want to deliver to your clients

Simple Pocket Presentation Folders

  • Simple in design and colors
  • Cost effective as no customization is involved
  • All the panels are simple rectangular and is of regular 9″x12″ folder die
  • Regular matte or glossy finish / lamination is used
  • Because of the cost effective solution only flood UV coating is used
  • one, two or three color printing is used only on the outside of the presentation folders. Also printing is not done up to the bleeds of the folder
  • No special effects are used due to cost effectiveness
  • Regular CMYK process color inks are used to reduce the cost
  • No panatone or special inks are used

Delivering a Grand Presentation

For business people, the thought of presenting in a public situation can be a frightening and often unavoidable proposition. If you are tasked with making a presentation to others, here are a few simple tips and considerations to help you deliver a grand presentation.

1. Show your confidence in yourself!

The first few minutes of your presentation, the audience will give you the benefit of any doubt so capture them! Audiences generally want to like a presenter, and they will give you a few minutes at the beginning to engage them, but if you miss this opportunity, you may not be given another. Give them the tip of the iceberg. In other words tell them enough about what you are going to talk about to create intrigue and curiosity. Your confidence in your presentation material combined with enthusiastically capturing the audience will showcase your passion for your presentation.

2. Speaking of passionate

Be passionate about your topic and let that enthusiasm show through. If you do, you won’t have to worry as much about voice projection, intonation, gesturing, or posture. Your message will not only be evident in your material but in your body language. Your content, professionalism, and visuals are leveraged by your enthusiasm and passion for your material.

3. To use or not to use the podium

Many presenters head straight to the podium after being introduced and never leave the podium until they’re done. Unless you’ve been invited to give a lecture on binomial nomenclature or the archeological significance of trilobites, move around. Try to move closer to your audience by standing in front of or away from the podium. A podium is a barrier. During my undergraduate studies, all I ever remember of my American history professor was from her nose up. The podium covered up the rest of her body. The goal of your presentation is to connect with the audience. Touch the audience with both your physical proximity and the passionate content of your message.

4. Keep it concise

People have short attention spans and most are multitasking out of necessity these days. Audience attention is greatest at the beginning of your presentation and will wane as time passes. So, evaluate the organization of your presentation so that you can keep coming back to your central theme you used in the beginning when you gave away the tip of the iceberg. This will keep your audience centered and more attentive. Stories are great anecdotal tools in a presentation however keep them short and lively, make sure they support the central theme of your presentation, and enhance the message.

5. Practice

Practice your presentation often. You will find yourself modifying your presentation iteratively until you have it just where you want it to be. Video yourself practicing from several angles and see if you would enjoy your own presentation. We tend to be our own worst critics. Ask a trusted friend to critique your presentation. Most of us can easily talk about ourselves because the subject matter is well known to us. Through practice, practice, and more practice, you will come to know your subject matter so well that it will be as easy to cover as talking about yourself.

Considering all the work that goes into making a grand presentation, the delivery of the presentation takes the least amount of time but represents the showcase of your efforts, talents, energies, and passion about the material you cover. So deliver with confidence, passion, enthusiasm, and respect for brevity and you might be surprised to find yourself invited back to present again.